The Holy Saturday  festival commemorates the time that Jesus is said to have lain in the tomb and descended into hell, defying death and releasing those held captive there, including Adam and Eve. According to orthodox tradition, at exactly 2 pm on this day, a sun beam is said to shine on Jesus’ tomb, lighting 33 candles held by the Patriarch of the Greek Church who waits inside the tomb. The Patriarch then emerges carrying the Holy Fire to light the candles of thousands of worshippers that crowd into the Church for the ceremony. But because of the strict guidelines defining which part of the Church belongs to which of the six churches based there, Jerusalem’s tiny Ethiopian community conducts its own Holy Fire ceremony later on Saturday evening in the courtyard of the Deir Al-Sultan monastery, which sits on the rooftop of the Church.

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One Response to “Israel Jerusalem: The Enchanting Holy Saturday” Subscribe

  1. Susan Woog Wagner January 27, 2015 at 7:12 pm #

    Beautiful use of light and composition. I especially like the black and white shot and the woman through the window, i.e. frame within a frame.
    Your work is outstanding Ruti!

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